Windows 11: How to enable TPM on your PC

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Windows 11: How to enable TPM on your PC

Credit: Windows Central

Users of Windows 10 may get Windows 11 for free right now. However, if your PC doesn’t satisfy Microsoft’s system requirements, you might not be able to upgrade. Support for TPM 2.0 is one such requirement. Don’t worry if you have no idea what a TPM is; most of us didn’t either until Microsoft made it a Windows requirement.

A TPM, or Trusted Platform Module, is a hardware-level security measure meant to protect your computer from hackers. Computers built within the past five years should have a TPM, but older machines do not. Though you’re free to install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware, it’s not recommended. As I said in my piece about failing to install Windows 11 on my previous PC, the safest approach is purchasing a new PC and updating it to Microsoft’s latest operating system. Also, you can see how to factory reset of Windows 11

Even if you have a brand-new PC, you might not be able to fulfill the TPM 2.0 requirements. TPM is enabled by default on certain computers, but not on others. That was the situation with the 3080 Ti build I just bought. I used Microsoft’s Health Check program and satisfied all of the requirements, with the exception of TPM 2.0. I knew it had a TPM because it was a new PC; all I had to do was figure out how to turn it on.

Microsoft explains how to enable TPM on PCs that have one, however the instructions are spread out over numerous pages. As a result, we’ve created this straightforward how-to tutorial to assist you with enabling TPM on your PC.

How to enter BIOS

To enable TPM, you’ll need to go into your system’s BIOS. This may appear to be a daunting task, but it is rather simple.

Pressing Start and then heading to Settings > Update & Security > Recovery > Restart Now is one approach to go into BIOS.

Recovery

Credit: Future

You should see a menu of options once your computer restarts. Select Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > UEFI Firmware Settings > Restart from the Troubleshoot menu.

Choose an option

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Advanced Option

Credit: Tom’s Guide

UEFI Firmware Settings

Credit: Toms’s Guide

Alternatively, when restarting your computer, hold down the Shift key to bring up the BIOS menu. Some systems enable you to enter BIOS by pressing Delete or F1 during bootup; you’ll normally receive a text message throughout the bootup process instructing you which key to press to enter BIOS.

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Once you’ve gotten into your BIOS, you’ll probably have to seek and peck for an option to enable TPM.

Don’t give up if you can’t locate a TPM setting to enable it; some contemporary PCs include TPM equivalents. Because my PC has an Asus motherboard with PTT, which is a firmware-based TPM alternative, I had to go to Advanced > Find PCH-FW Configuration to activate TPM. 

If your BIOS doesn’t include a TPM toggle, read your motherboard’s documentation (or Google your exact motherboard model) to see if there is another TPM option.

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Save and exit when you’re done.

Relaunch the Health Check app, and your PC should now be shown as meeting Windows 11 requirements.

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Even though Microsoft’s PC Health Check software (which is particularly designed to evaluate if your PC fulfills the Windows 11 system requirements) says you’re good to go, Windows Update (located in Settings) may still suggest your PC doesn’t match all of the criteria to upgrade to Windows 11. I’m not sure why this gap exists, but it shouldn’t stop you from updating.

Enabling TPM in BIOS

Credit: Tom’s Guide

Go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Security > Device security to see if TPM has been successfully activated.

Select Security processor information from the Security processor drop-down menu. TPM will be activated or disabled based on a set of specifications. It was in my situation.

Security Processor

Credit: Tom’s Guide

After all of that, it’s safe to install Windows 11 on your PC. You’re now free to enjoy all that Windows 11 has to offer.

Though activating TPM makes upgrading Windows 11 a little more complicated, it doesn’t need a lot of technical knowledge. The most critical thing is that your system already supports TPM 2.0.

However, if you discover after all of this labour that your PC lacks TPM 2.0, have no fear: if you have at least TPM 1.2, you can overcome Windows 11’s insane system requirements using this hack, and Windows 11 can be made to operate on PCs without TPM at all if you do a clean install from the ground up.

This is an ISO file. Keep in mind that while Windows 11 will function on PCs that don’t match the minimum system requirements, it will do so in a “unsupported” form, meaning that crucial updates and security fixes may not be available.

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